Nature- Heartfelt tales

Landscapes~ November crush

November, your last chance for fall walks in the park. ~ Hints Of Life

Central Park._Fall colors_landscape
Fall soaked brooks, oaks, elms, red maples in the North Woods, Central Park

November comes with a ‘crush’, a heart crush for Central Park as it enthralls you in its  fall spirit, and a dramatic weather crush as temperatures in New York City dipped below 20 degrees Fahrenheit on November 10, calling for a freeze weather alert. These conditions  killed all the crops and other sensitive vegetation, ending the growing season for 2017. Catastrophic!

As I welcome the change, I wish to let the days flow with grace. I want to surrender myself to the small cozy corner in my house more often. Where I wish to write loving and positive thoughts and think of ways to spread joy and goodness this holiday season. As these thoughts escape my conscious, I remember spending a perfect November afternoon in Central Park a week ago. Colored in the spirit of fall the Park dazzled in shades of purple, reds, orange and yellow hues.

American Elm_Central Park_Fall colors
American Elm (yellow) in North Woods, Central Park

American Elm
American elm a predominant specie in Central Park is found in the North woods; West Side to Mid-Park from 101st to 110th street and The mall; Mid-Park 66th to 72nd street. A high canopied, in shape either fountain or vase, the elm is by habit and nature conducive to a grandeur and elegance not lost on Frederick Law Olmsted, Central Park’s designer. Olmsted saw in the American elm, a favorite of his, a tree conducive to creating canopied spaces intended to evoke the tranquil intimacy of ecclesiastical chambers, writes;

By 1860 the first two elm saplings were already growing in Central Park’s turf. Ever since efforts have been made to  isolate the elms from contamination by the neighboring elms or becoming victims of the Dutch Elm disease. The difficult task is a result of the close watch by the gardeners of the Central Park Conservancy, now forming one of the largest remaining plantations of the trees. (Source:

Central Park._Fall colors_landscape._
A moment with my three friends at Central Park

To me, Central Park in November is about taking the last fall walks. To be mesmerized by the beautiful landscapes (all around) before it vanishes away. I visited the park on a mid-week afternoon for two simple reasons, it is less crowded around the time and it gives me a chance to enjoy my own company. Other than me, it were the three dogs (in the picture above) running the length and breath of the North Woods and having a time of their life. I soon befriended them and even chased them with all my strength as they sprinted on the beautiful fall foliage. Stopping sometimes only to rub their face against the soft leaves and other times to stretch their limbs for a little while.

I entered the park from West 79th street, and walked towards the North Woods this time. The sight of the mighty American elm, pulled me to that part of the park. I must tell you,  elms are loved for their graceful, stately shape, with branches like spreading fountains, and their green leaves turning gold in fall. As you see in the pictures above it were these beautiful landscapes that captured my senses. Other than the elms, the North Woods is home to Black cheery trees that change their color to yellow, & red; Pin oak trees that turn russet, bronze, & red; Red oak tress that turn to yellow, brown, & red; Scarlet oaks turning scarlet and Red maple turning red.

So if you are planning to visit the New York City Parks anytime soon. I suggest, November (precisely now) as an excellent time to visit, as some of the most popular parks in New York afford glimpses of spectacular fall colors. And Central Park, home to about 20,000 species of trees with the changing colors is a breathtaking sight. So why wait friends! Don’t think, just make your way to Central Park soon.

Singing off with best wishes to all. 

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